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#WingedJewels . . . Fantastic plumage.

 

 

Grey Peacock-pheasant (Polyplectron bicalcaratum) by Yann Muzika.

This peacock-pheasant is distributed in lowland and hill forests of Bangladesh, Northeast India and Southeast Asia. An American counterpart is the ocellated turkey.

 

 

 

 

Text and image source: BIRDS page https://www.facebook.com/375769122502251/posts/3289934594419008/

#wingedJewels . . . nesting time

 

Glittering-throated Emerald (Amazilia fimbriata) breeding by Andrew Snyder Photography

 

 

 

 

Text and image source: BIRDS page on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/375769122502251/posts/3275332632545871/

#WingedJewels . . . Indian Pittas

 

Indian pittas roost in trees. They feed on insects and other small invertebrates that they usually pick up from the ground or leaf litter.
They breed during the south-west monsoon from June to August, with peaks in June in central India, and in July in northern India. The nest is a globular structure with a circular opening on one side built on the ground or on low branches. It is made up of dry leaves and grasses. The clutch is four to five eggs which are very glossy white and spherical with spots and speckles of deep maroon or purple. (Wikipedia)

photo credit: Shantanu Kuveskar – https://www.instagram.com/shantanukuveskar

 

 

 

Text and image source: The birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees https://www.facebook.com/695285933892742/posts/3325182770903032/

#WingedJewels . . . . Monal, nature’s magnificent creation!!




The Himalayan monal, also known as the Impeyan monal and Impeyan pheasant,
is a bird in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. It is the national bird of Nepal, where
it is known as the danphe, and state bird of Uttarakhand, India, where it is known
as the monal. It was also the state bird of Himachal Pradesh until 2007.

Wikipedia












Photo credit: Aditya Chavan. @ Birdwatching https://www.facebook.com/birdfun.1/

#WingedJewels . . . . The spiderhunters






“The spiderhunters are omnivorous. As their name suggests they will eat spiders, and are capable of extracting spiders from the centre of their webs, a tricky task. They also consume a wide range of other small arthropod prey including crickets, caterpillars, butterflies, ants and other insects. In addition to animal prey they also consume nectar from flowers.”
~ (Wikipedia)











photo credit: JJ Harrison –
Text & image source: The birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees
https://www.facebook.com/allaboutthebirdsandthebeestheflowersandthetrees/

#WingedJewels . . . . Penguins




 

“One can’t be angry when one looks at a Penguin” 


― John Ruskin (1819 – 1900)












https://www.literaryconnections.co.uk/resources/ruskin.html
Emperor Penguins – Antarctica 1992
Text & image source: Tom Woolley https://web.facebook.com/tom.woolley.12